Natural Pest Remedies

Warm weather is here, and most of us are happy to enjoy a season of pleasant conditions. Unfortunately, the weather also brings a host of unwelcome house guests, including ants, mosquitos, mice, and other pests. There are so many chemicals out there to get rid of the critters, however many people are concerned about the effects these chemicals can have on us, especially our children and the likelihood the chemicals could end up around food. We’ve gathered up a list of more natural remedies to get rid of any unwelcome pests. If you have any of your own, leave them in the comments section!

1. Flies: Flies dislike the smell of basil (and as an added bonus, it smells delicious and you can add it to your cooking!). Keeping potted basil in your kitchen, or near any doorways can prevent flies from entering or hanging around.

2. Mosquitos: Interestingly enough, mosquitos hate catnip, and it repels them better than DEET products and without the unwanted chemicals. Grow catnip in your garden, keep pots on your deck, or rub (undiluted) catnip oil on your skin just as your would a mosquito repellant.

3. Spiders: If spiders are common in your home, spray doorways and windowsills with water mixed with unsweetened lemon juice. Spiders don’t like citrus, and will avoid it.

4. Ants: Ants create scent trails to lead other ants and navigate around your home. A 50/50 solution of vinegar and water sprayed anywhere you have seen ants destroys their trail. Ants also dislike the scent of peppermint, so a couple of drops of peppermint essential oil around their entrance points (if you can locate them) often can deter them.

5. Fruit flies: If you notice fruit flies in your kitchen, trap them in a glass filled 3/4 of the way with vinegar (cider or white), then a couple of drops of dishwashing liquid. Fill the rest of the glass with warm water and let sit. Your fruit flies will be trapped in the glass within a couple of hours.

6. Deer: If deer are ruining your garden, hang bars of Irish Spring soap around the edges, or sprinkle small chunks on the ground among the plants the deer like to eat.

 

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